BlueBloggin

Taking Texas And The Nation Back

Archive for the ‘Petraeus’ Category

Soldiers Are Collapsing Where They Stand

Posted by nytexan on August 11, 2007

The truth about the health and well being of our troops never seems to get covered by the main stream media. However, the truth about the U.S. troops seems to smack the British media right in the face.

While Bush will stand up there and continue to lie to us and Petraeus will present a bogus report in September, our soldiers are collapsing where they stand. All is not well in the real world of the Iraq war. As you read the article you will see that the soldiers are not allowed to tell the media what’s really going on. Shocking that Bush would be deceiving the American public.

Here’s alittle tidbit that’s at the end of the article “America’s ‘war tsar’ has called for the nation’s political leaders to consider bringing back the draft to help a military exhausted by wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.”

falluja10c.jpg

Exhaustion and combat stress are besieging US troops in Iraq as they battle with a new type of warfare. Some even rely on Red Bull to get through the day. As desertions and absences increase, the military is struggling to cope with the crisis.

Lieutenant Clay Hanna looks sick and white. Like his colleagues he does not seem to sleep. Hanna says he catches up by napping on a cot between operations in the command centre, amid the noise of radio. He is up at 6am and tries to go to sleep by 2am or 3am. But there are operations to go on, planning to be done and after-action reports that need to be written. And war interposes its own deadly agenda that requires his attention and wakes him up.

When he emerges from his naps there is something old and paper-thin about his skin, something sketchy about his movements as the days go by.

The Americans he commands, like the other men at Sullivan – a combat outpost in Zafraniya, south east Baghdad – hit their cots when they get in from operations. But even when they wake up there is something tired and groggy about them. They are on duty for five days at a time and off for two days. When they get back to the forward operating base, they do their laundry and sleep and count the days until they will get home. It is an exhaustion that accumulates over the patrols and the rotations, over the multiple deployments, until it all joins up, wiping out any memory of leave or time at home. Until life is nothing but Iraq.

Hanna and his men are not alone in being tired most of the time. A whole army is exhausted and worn out. You see the young soldiers washed up like driftwood at Baghdad’s international airport, waiting to go on leave or returning to their units, sleeping on their body armour on floors and in the dust.

Where once the war in Iraq was defined in conversations with these men by untenable ideas – bringing democracy or defeating al-Qaeda – these days the war in Iraq is defined by different ways of expressing the idea of being weary. It is a theme that is endlessly reiterated as you travel around Iraq. ‘The army is worn out. We are just keeping people in theatre who are exhausted,’ says a soldier working for the US army public affairs office who is supposed to be telling me how well things have been going since the ‘surge’ in Baghdad began.

They are not supposed to talk like this. We are driving and another of the public affairs team adds bitterly: ‘We should just be allowed to tell the media what is happening here. Let them know that people are worn out. So that their families know back home. But it’s like we’ve become no more than numbers now.’

The first soldier starts in again. ‘My husband was injured here. He hit an improvised explosive device. He already had a spinal injury. The blast shook out the plates. He’s home now and has serious issues adapting. But I’m not allowed to go back home to see him. If I wanted to see him I’d have to take leave time (two weeks). And the army counts it.’

A week later, in the northern city of Mosul, an officer talks privately. ‘We’re plodding through this,’ he says after another patrol and another ambush in the city centre. ‘I don’t know how much more plodding we’ve got left in us.’

When the soldiers talk like this there is resignation. There is a corrosive anger, too, that bubbles out, like the words pouring unbidden from a chaplain’s assistant who has come to bless a patrol. ‘Why don’t you tell the truth? Why don’t you journalists write that this army is exhausted?’

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Posted in Afghanistan, Bush, Health, Iraq, mental health, military, News, Petraeus, Politics, Soldiers, veterans, War, War Czar | 6 Comments »

Mixed Signals and Doublespeak

Posted by bosskitty on August 5, 2007

Gates Says Troop Drawdown Possible

WASHINGTON –  Defense Secretary Robert Gates acknowledged Sunday that political stability in Iraq won’t likely happen before the Bush administration makes its critical September assessment on whether its war strategy is working. But Gates declined to predict that a drawdown of U.S. military forces in such a scenario would happen by year’s end.

Gates is almost good at ‘doublespeak‘. More references to Orwellian moments.

“It’s a possibility,” Gates hedged, when asked if he considered a troop drawdown this year a “strong possibility” or would bet on it.

“We’re doing contingency planning on a lot of different possibilities,” Gates said.

“Circumstances changed in a different way,” Gates said. “That’s the process we hope will evolve over time.”

Gates cannot keep his optimism afloat. Speculation about what US “drawdown” capabilities will be when Petraeus reads his script in September, is a marketing exercise. Why can’t Gates keep his story straight? Because, he has no clue what script will handed to him, he is not the only Hollywood production in the works.

US may start Iraq pull-out this year, says Gates
Gates: U.S. underestimated Iraq ‘mistrust’
Gates says Iraq politics disappointing

Gates says political stability in Iraq unlikely before September

Then, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice says on Fox Noise,
Security “has improved some” because of U.S. and Iraqi cooperation, she said Sunday.

“Clearly, too, we have a lot of work to do on the political side,” she said. But, she added, “I would not underestimate the importance of the continuing work of the leaders of these very powerful parties in Iraq.” A majority vote would get the law passed “but it would not have the force of all of the groups that wanted to do this,” she said. “They don’t want a 51-49 on constitutional reform.”

Condi is expert at ‘doublespeak‘. No one can pin her down on anything.

Posted in 1984, Al Qaeda, Anti-War, Armageddon, Baghdad, Black Ops, Blackwater, Bush, Casualties, Cheney, CIA, Collateral, Contractors, Corporate corruption, cover up, Democracy In Action, disinformation, DOD, DoubleSpeak, Gates, Hypocracy, Iraq, Islamic Jihad, Joint Chiefs, Maliki, Mercenaries, Middle East, military, Moqtada al-Sadr, Occupation Army, Oil, Orwellian, Outsource, Oversight, Pentagon Corruption, Petraeus, Politics, profiteers, resonsibility, Rice, sectarian, Soldiers, The Divider, The Liar, threat, VA, veterans, War, War Contractors, War Cost | 1 Comment »

Petraeus Not Welcome In Iraq

Posted by bosskitty on July 28, 2007

Iraqi leader tells Bush: Get Gen Petraeus out

By Damien McElroy, Foreign Affairs Correspondent

Relations between the top United States general in Iraq and Nouri al-Maliki, the country’s prime minister, are so bad that the Iraqi leader made a direct appeal for his removal to President George W Bush.

Although the call was rejected, aides to both men admit that Mr Maliki and Gen David Petraeus engage in frequent stand-up shouting matches, differing particularly over the US general’s moves to arm Sunni tribesmen to fight al-Qa’eda.

At another meeting with Gen Petraeus, Mr Maliki said: “I can’t deal with you any more. I will ask for someone else to replace you.”

Can’t we all just get along?

No!

Saudi Arabia is convinced that Maliki is an Iranian intelligence agent … Our track record choosing leaders remains sad … America is still leadership challenged.

 

Posted in Bush, Iran, Iraq, Maliki, Petraeus, Saudi Arabia | 7 Comments »